Triggered communication strategies: are you reaching out at the right points?

Mojn_blog-Triggered-comms

We’ve all gotten one. A triggered email, that is. Whether you left an item in your cart, subscribed to a new mailing list or failed to complete the full registration process, chances are you’ve gotten an automatic email nudging you to complete whatever action it is that you started. Sometimes, these automated emails, triggered by an incomplete consumer action, are very helpful, and can nudge consumers in the right direction. Other times, they can be little more than a fleeting annoyance cleared up by pressing ‘Delete’ without opening. Learn how to get it right.

Event-triggered, automatic email sequences

Although used by less than 15% of companies, an automatic email triggered by an incomplete action can prompt a consumer to come back and complete the action. What kinds of actions are appropriate for an event-triggered communication strategy such as automatic email sequences?

What kinds of actions are appropriate for event-triggered, automatic email sequences?

  1. introductory welcome emails for leads or subscribers
  2. reactivation sequence for unengaged customers or leads
  3. those who browse or search on your site, but don’t purchase
  4. abandoned shopping cart items
  5. refill, repurchase and replenishing finite items or services, such as class packs

With all the opportunities to send out these emails, why do so few companies send them?

Although used by less than 15% of companies, an automatic email triggered by an incomplete action can prompt a consumer to come back and complete the action.

Creating a triggered email sequence

Although technology can take most of the grunt work of a triggered email campaign, many marketers site lack of time as a reason for not setting up these emails. But a little work sooner can result in a lot of money later. You simply need to identify times in your customer journey when a triggered email sequence would be appropriate. This should be relatively easy: at what points do your customers or leads tend to drop off? Is it after subscribing to a mailing list? Is it after viewing a few pages on your site? These are good places to start identifying where an email or series of emails that educate on value and nudge for the completion of the incomplete action will come in handy. For each email, make sure you define the following:

  1. Trigger event. These can be actions such as signing up for a webinar, leaving an item in a basket or searching for an item on your site
  2. Focus of your message. You’ll want to make sure the focus of your message is very closely related to the action that triggered the email.
  3. Purpose of the email. Essentially, this is where you will want to specify what call to action you will employ- will it be a hard sell to complete the action? Will it be a softer push to revisit the site to get more information? Remember, you can split test to see what calls to action get the best results.

Triggered emails sent after site searches get 200% higher open rates and 50% higher click-through rates than standard emails.

Results from triggered email sequences

According to stats from Email Marketing Reports, individuals who get triggered, automatic emails prompted by cart abandonment spend 55% more than those who buy in the first place. In addition, triggered emails sent after site searches get 200% higher open rates and 50% higher click-through rates than standard emails.

If you haven’t had the time to create one, or several, triggered, automatic emails sequences, you’ll want to get down to it. The work you put in will definitely be worth the return you get back.

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  • http://altaire.com mauricecflynn

    Thanks Irfan for a useful article. Here at Altaire.com were helping email marketers tackle these issues every day. You approach is relevant for us so Ill also drop you a line via LinkedIn. Thanks again